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Friday 5 | 5 Ways the Rio 2016 Olympics Will Shake Up the Internet

Consumer Trends & Insight, Entertainment, General, Media, News, Technology
Friday 5  RIO 2016

With so many new technologies and platforms, here are five ways the Rio 2016 Olympics will shake up the Internet.

When the Opening Ceremony officially kicks off the 2016 Summer Olympics today, the world will turn its eyes to Rio de Janeiro. And, to further engage with the event, it is estimated that three billion fans will also turn their eyes to the Internet.

A lot has changed in the digital world since London hosted the Games in 2012. Snapchat had barely been launched and Facebook had just acquired Instagram. There are major updates even when we look back at the 2014 Winter Olympics and 2014 FIFA World Cup. Social livestreaming was not a thing and news coverage did not include 360° videos.

With so many new technologies and platforms, here are five ways the Rio 2016 Olympics will shake up the Internet.

1. The Rio 2016 Olympics Will Be a Social Media Extravaganza

When the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil wrapped up, it was considered the biggest social event in Web history, with the final game generating 280 million interactions by 88 million people just on Facebook. Regardless of the rivalry between Olympic Games and World Cup as the biggest sports event in the world, the digital ecosystem is stronger today than it was two years ago. Also, Rio 2016 is expected to attract more than 3.6 billion global viewers on TV and, according to Global Web Index, 85% of them will likely use second-screen devices throughout the 19 days of competition. Therefore many are dubbing Rio 2016 the most talked-about Games on social media yet and even the largest social media event ever.

2. Some of the World’s Most Beloved Athletes Are in Rio Now

Some athletes have such a connection with their fans that they are a common choice for brand ambassadors and appear on every list of the most popular social media accounts. No sports event gathers as many athletes as the Summer Olympics, and more than 10,000 of them are in Rio right now. That includes world-renowned names such as Neymar Jr., Kevin Durant, Serena Williams, Usain Bolt, Novak Djokovic and Michael Phelps. Despite the much discussed “Rule 40” of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which restricts any advertising or individual exploitation of athletes’ images during the competitions, the presence of those idols will generate a real buzz among millions of fans, hungry for medals, for following the best Olympic moments and, of course, for discovering everything about Olympic Village’s backstage.

3. Digital Media and the New TV  

Snapchat scored a deal with NBC, the broadcast rights holder of the Olympics, to set up a dedicated channel and create daily “live stories” using on-the-ground content from NBC, athletes and sports fans. Facebook also developed a partnership with NBC and will gain exclusive content – including interviews, highlights, recaps, and short-form videos to be posted on Facebook and Instagram. In addition, Google tapped into the Olympics conversation by creating its own piece of content, “Beyond the Map.” Launched on July 29, this immersive experience brings Street View and 360° technology to favelas in Rio for the first time and tells the story of some residents. In Brazil, Globo TV in partnership with Japanese NHK will promote an experimental 8K terrestrial broadcasting (with a resolution 16 times higher than the standard known as Full HD), besides broadcasting the games for more than 40 web channels.

4. True 360 VR Tech Will Be Deployed for the First Time

NBC has announced it will be showing 100 hours of virtual reality and 360° video programming using its new Sports app. Olympic sponsors, such as GE, will explore Games content through 360° videos. And on Rio 2016 official app, viewers can find more 360° content about modalities and backstage. Also, anyone that has a Facebook profile can post 360° pictures!

5. Brazilians Are Obsessed with Social Media

Brazilians alone can turn a local topic into a global trend. In 2014, “Brazilian Elections” became the third most discussed global topic on Facebook. Last week, when British YouTuber Marina Joyce caused a frenzy among her fans, the hashtag #savemarinajoyce trended globally. But in Brazil, what trended was the misspelled version #savemariajoyce, which reached more than three million people in the country. Brazilians love memes and social trends. They are also one of the most engaged populations regarding brands’ social presence – more than 50% recommend brand content in social to friends. They spend on average four hours per day on social channels. And their good sense of humor is contagious: When Brazil’s soccer team lost to Germany (the historic 7×1 match in Brazil’s 2014 World Cup), they moved on via the website brasilalemanhaeterno.com, which shows what the score would be if the two teams were still playing.

So, let the Games begin.

Find this article online: http://edl.mn/2aWGcg2

 

Written by: Paula Nadal and Manuela Nogueira

Responding to Brexit: Where to for Business?

Corporate Reputation, General, Government Affairs, Media, News
Edelman Brexit

At Edelman, our team of policy experts in Ireland and across our European network is focusing on the options for the UK government and the EU in the lead up to exit negotiations, how these will impact Ireland and individual business sectors and what companies and organisations should be doing to have their voices heard on what each believes is the best way forward.

While many are still analysing the reasons for the UK’s ‘leave’ vote in last month’s referendum, companies and organisations operating in Ireland, the UK and across Europe are examining the UK and EU’s likely next steps and their implications for both strategy and operations.

At Edelman, our team of policy experts in Ireland and across our European network is focusing on the options for the UK government and the EU in the lead up to exit negotiations, how these will impact Ireland and individual business sectors and what companies and organisations should be doing to have their voices heard on what each believes is the best way forward.

Read the full piece here: Edelman Brexit – July 2016

 

Written by: Joe Carmody, Managing Director at Edelman

Edelman launches Edelman Edge, a New Global Campaigning Methodology

Corporate Reputation, Government Affairs, Innovation, News, Technology
Edelman Edge

Edelman have launched of Edelman Edge, the first global campaigning methodology designed to provide a comprehensive, objective analysis of the communications environment anywhere in the world.

Edelman have announced the launch of Edelman Edge, the first global campaigning methodology designed to provide a comprehensive, objective analysis of the communications environment anywhere in the world.

Edelman Edge provides a science-based framework to easily adapt multi-market campaigns to local market conditions. Using a proprietary market research model, Edelman Edge helps companies and governments to understand and better leverage the key drivers that shape issue-centric campaigning based on a consistent analysis of the structural and environmental factors as well as the latest social science.

Stephanie Lvovich, global chair of public affairs at Edelman, said “Public affairs and issue campaigning are in the middle of an important revolution, and at Edelman we are seeking to lead innovation in global issue campaigning.  As a discipline, public affairs was built on local expertise and knowledge, and these continue to be important factors in success today.  However, as clients’ global footprints have expanded, they often don’t have the expertise or communications staff on the ground where they operate.  Today, issues spread across borders so quickly creating an additional need for a framework through which to manage the same issue across multiple geographies”.

The Edelman Edge model analyses 25 political, economic, social and cultural drivers that determine the campaigning and stakeholder engagement environments in a market.  It provides a digestible roadmap for senior public affairs practitioners who need to understand the diverse, multi-market/multi-regional landscape that they manage. Edelman Edge helps companies understand not only the key communications and advocacy attributes of each market, but also provides a science-based, consistent explanation of WHY the market’s campaigning environment is the way it is.

Edelman Edge captures the subtle but very important nuances among markets, and accurately paints a picture of the stakeholder environment anywhere in the world.  This understanding then forms the basis of Edge country and regional reports that inform how a global strategy or communications campaign can be nuanced and tailored to suit a wide variety of market contexts.

“We created Edelman Edge to provide an additional layer of insights to inform campaign strategy – it is a completely unique prism through which to understand the communications and advocacy environment around the world.  The Edge gives clients clear and actionable guidance on how to effectively localise global campaigns and identify synergies in execution through a more intelligent hub and spokes model,” Lvovich said. “It is particularly relevant for clients who have a global, regional or multi-geography role or are managing issues across borders.”

Edelman Edge country reports and other materials will be hosted on an online platform and available to download on demand. For more information about the Edge, visit edge.edelman.com.

Irish Energy – Communications Challenges and Opportunities

Corporate Reputation, Energy, Innovation, News, Trust
Energy

The Edelman Trust Barometer demonstrates that energy is amongst the least trusted of sectors globally, with 50% trust levels reported in Ireland. This trust deficit means that energy companies’ communications strategies must work even harder to earn attention and build reputation.

As European and Irish policies move firmly towards creating a low-carbon energy future, focused on tackling climate change, supporting research and innovation and encouraging citizen-empowerment, the strategic communications imperative for energy companies is clear. There is an opportunity for organisations operating in the sector to demonstrate leadership and present their positions in a transparent and credible way.

In Ireland, the current debate on the future of rural areas will require a focus on energy, among other sectors. The need to create economic opportunity in urban and non-urban areas necessitates investment in energy infrastructure – upgrading the national grid, investing in alternative energy sources and developing community energy projects. The White Paper on Energy, published late last year, sets out numerous steps in this regard.

However, despite the policy advances, the reality is that communicating about energy remains challenging – it is a complex, technical subject that, while impacting on our daily lives, feels far from the consumer. In spite of the opportunities it presents, the ‘low-carbon future’ is something that is largely tangential for the majority. The scientific reality of climate change is clear, but whether it (and the actions needed to tackle it), have filtered down to the general population is questionable.

The Edelman Trust Barometer demonstrates that energy is amongst the least trusted of sectors globally (ahead of pharmaceuticals and financial services), with 50% trust levels reported in Ireland. This trust deficit means that energy companies’ communications strategies must work even harder to earn attention and build reputation. The focus must be on engaging the end-user by ensuring that communications are relevant and understandable and that messages resonate.

As audiences are more sceptical of the traditional elites – business and the system of government – and demand more engagement, energy organisations have an opportunity to talk to them about the things that matter most to them, and demonstrate how they are addressing their issues. By taking action on issues beyond the company’s core business, but which matter to the consumer, companies grow their connection to the consumer and build trust. In addition, there is an opportunity for business – more trusted than the system of government – to seek to address societal and economic challenges, where government cannot – by leading on issues, solving problems as innovators and prosperity-creators, positive reputational impact will result, supporting licence to operate.

Looking at the current environment – undoubtedly we live in an age of activism. Global actions have risen more than 430% since 2000, with energy the most targeted sector. 87% of people want the companies they interact with to share their core values and thus, communications strategies must be focused on leadership and engagement.  Historically, energy companies communicated with regulators and investors – this now needs to be expanded to all stakeholders, including the general public. Engagement, to be meaningful, should be two-way and ongoing, with a broad stakeholder group.

At Edelman, our research demonstrates that audiences are pragmatic and clearly understand that companies can do well, and ‘do good’. 82% of Irish respondents to the Edelman Trust Barometer 2015 agrees that ‘a company can take specific actions that both increase profits and improve the economic and social conditions in the community in which it operates’. The way is now clear for a new conversation.

This needs a new energy language.  ‘Low-carbon’ must be broken down to be something that makes sense to people, to their lives and to their communities.

Energy is changing. New technologies are emerging and the model for utilities companies – with the opportunities provided by data and IOT – is developing apace. Consumers will be central to this energy advance and to the energy conversation. Therefore organisations in the energy sector will best protect reputation and licence to operate, by developing communications strategies that are creative, digital and based on leadership, transparency and trust.

Written by: Grace Milton, Account Director at Edelman

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